Articles

If you dress up as Michael Jackson, can I say I want to marry Megan Fox?

In Culture, Media, Music, People on July 4, 2009 by Petr Bokuvka Tagged: , , ,

(c) Agence France-Presse

(c) Agence France-Presse

MOTTO:
I am quite certain that thousands of people whom Jackson helped the most (Third-World children) do not even know that he is dead because they do not own a TV set, or because they still have to work on their parents’ corn fields to feed younger siblings
. Instead, we have thousands of weeping middle-class kids who listen to Jackson because it is a part of their musical taste and lifestyle they can afford. Kids who think that he “changed their lives” – whereas he had only brought them the music style he knew they would like…

Every death is a tragedy if a person does not die from natural causes. The death of Michael Jackson is a tragedy for the music industry because he did influence it a lot. But as for Jackson himself, his death was not tragic, it was unfortunate.

But the events surrounding the aftermath are tragic.

Hundreds of fans cried on the main square in Prague – and many of them were dressed as Jackson look-alikes. And we are shown old footage of his previous concerts with women yelling “I love you, Michael” over and over again.

I honestly think there is something very unhealthy (pathological, even) about dressing up as your favorite mass culture hero and meaning it (i.e. if we rule out costume parties), or about yelling “I love you” at them. I don’t think that it is that big a difference between cross-dressing to make yourself look like an opposite-sex music idol and actual stalking. Both is a display of affection towards a person you know you will never have (romantically, sexually). Only the latter is a potential felony that may result in a restraining order, though…

I am surprised that so far none of the media outlets that have been covering the frenzy has brought a psychologist to a TV studio and asked something along the lines of:

This is a product of popular culture we are talking about. It is business. Shouldn’t the people who can’t keep their personal distance between their private life and a product of mass culture they consume seek professional help, just like gamblers do when they lose control?

I am quite certain that thousands of people whom Jackson helped the most (Third-World children) do not even know that he is dead because they do not own a TV set, or because they still have to work on their parents’ corn fields to feed younger siblings. Instead, we have thousands of weeping middle-class kids who listen to Jackson because it is a part of their musical taste and lifestyle they can afford. Kids who think that he “changed their lives” – whereas he had only brought them the music style he knew they would like. And they “lost control” the minute they put on “his” sunglasses, hat and curls, the minute they convinced themselves that this made-by-Jones product of popular culture is everything to them…

Try to tell them that worldwide-famous Czech composer Bedrich Smetana or French writer Guy de Maupassant died of syphilis and their reaction will be “Who?” – because they haven’t seen them on MTV.

If any of the above is accepted as normal, I should be allowed to say on TV that I think that Megan Fox is the most beautiful woman (in showbusiness) that I have ever seen and that I will do anything (within the limits of the law) to get close to her – for example write her letters asking her the Howard-Stern-style questions (“shaved, or not”). But I won’t because I know she is a human being who happens to have a job of an actress.

The best way to show respect to an actor, singer or politician is to buy their products, i.e. go to see their movie, buy a new album, vote for them. And to support their activities, like charities. It makes much more sense than cross-dressing (after seeing a few female Jacksons I have to use this term).

The biggest irony is that the organisers of the Prague event played over forty songs; for which, I assume (according to the Czech Copyright Law), they will have to pay royalties to Jackson’s heirs. Plus, everything that has recently been said about money was always followed by the term “satisfaction of creditors”…

No business like showbusiness…

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